Reflections

April 27, 2019

Today, Second Sunday of Easter, we celebrate a very special occasion. As officially announced by then Pope John Paul II, now, St. John Paul II during the canonization of St. Faustina Kowalska in the year 2000, the Second Sunday of Easter is especially devoted for the celebration of the Divine Mercy. On this special day we remember and thank God for allowing us to experience his infinite mercy through the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ, His Only Begotten Son, our Lord and Savior.

In her diary, St. Faustina Kowalska, the Apostle of Divine Mercy, writes these words of Jesus for us, “Proclaim that mercy is the greatest attribute of God. All the works of My hands are crowned with mercy.” Indeed, this is the attitude of God towards us: His Divine Mercy is what makes Him persistent in finding each of us, his lost sheep. Through His Divine Mercy he will do whatever it takes to find us. We just need to cast off our doubts and believe in Him so that He may carry us back to His flock. Yes...

March 16, 2019

We have all experienced “dark moments” in our lives, moments when our life seemed to be abandoned by the light of hope, when we felt so lonely, left out and discouraged by life’s miseries like an inevitable death of a loved one due to an incurable disease, betrayed by our trusted friend, failed to reach our goal because of our failure to pass the board exams, struggling from certain addictions or pinned down by mortal sins. These are just some of life’s “dark moments” that we might have all experienced in one way or another. Such life’s challenges could bring us down and tear our life apart. They could also gravely affect our relationship with God, weaken our faith in Him and could eventually lead us to fall away from Him forever.

Yes. Many times we are easily discouraged by all these negativities. We find it hard to cope with all life’s sufferings. Thus, we tend to stop from struggling. We tend to stop from believing that God is always there for us. And yet, no matter how indifferent...

June 3, 2018

There is this English saying that goes, “We become what we eat.” Accordingly, the idea of this saying is to give us a keen insight about our health: eating healthy food results to good health and eating unhealthy food results to bad health. If you eat good food, you could have a healthy body. But if you eat bad food, like for example, junk foods, you might suffer from many illnesses. If you eat less, most likely you could have a slimmer body. But if you eat excessively, you might gain too much weight and might endanger yourself by becoming obese. Thus, you become vulnerable to many diseases like diabetes. 

 Well of course, this could not be absolutely true because having a healthy body does not only consist of eating healthy food or having a balanced diet. It also requires physical exercises and activities to flex and work out our muscles.  But for the sake of the argument, let us consider the saying as perfectly true that “we become what we eat.” Let us then ask ourselves, for the past...


(On the Ascension Sunday, World Communications Day, Brgy Election and Mothers Day)


We begin by gratefully recognizing all our mothers. We honor them as we offer the mass for our Nanay, Mama, Inay, Lola.

Mothers are so dear to our hearts. In fact, we do not only use word “mother” to our biological mother. We often associate mother with important realities close to our hearts. So we include “mother” in referring to our country (inang-bayan), to our Catholic church (inang-simbahan) or even to our native language (inang wika). Indeed, we find an affective connection of the love of a mother whenever we speak of our church, of our country and of our power to communicate.


Love for the Church
 

On the day of His ascension, Jesus entrusted His disciples the mission of forming communities of faith . Go and proclaim to the whole world, baptize them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit. Through the apostles, the church was born. Jesus does not leave his flock orphan b...

April 22, 2018

In the gospel Jesus gives us the Parable of the Good Shepherd. It shows the deep bond between the Shepherd and the sheep, explaining that strangers may try to persuade the sheep, perhaps by imitating the voice of their shepherd. But they will not follow them because they only obey the voice of their shepherd. “I am the good shepherd, and I know mine and mine know me…and they will hear my voice.” (John 10:14, 16). 


Accordingly, sheep have the ability to distinguish the distinct voice of their shepherd among the many voices of strangers. The latter may try to mimic their shepherd’s voice but their sharp memory can never be fooled. They know well their pastor’s voice and only his they will listen and follow. 


Sheep are also dependent on their shepherd since they cannot protect themselves from predators (They are prey animal.) They need to submit themselves under his guidance, follow him and rely on his protection and care in order to survive. And this is the key to their survival - heedin...

April 15, 2018

3rd Sunday of Easter - Gospel Reflection: Luke 24:35-48 

Many of us, if not all, have already experienced “dark moments” in our lives, moments when our life seemed to be abandoned by the light of hope, when we felt so lonely, left out and discouraged by life’s miseries like the inevitable death of a loved one due to an incurable disease, betrayed by a trusted friend, failed in board exams, or when we struggled from certain addictions and the like. These are just some of life’s “dark moments” that we might have all experienced in one way or another. Such moments could bring us down and tear our life apart. They could also gravely affect our relationship with God. They could weaken our faith in Him and could eventually lead us to fall away from Him forever. 


Yes. Many times we are easily discouraged by all these negativities. We find it hard to cope with all kinds of challenges in life. Many times we tend to stop from struggling. We stop from believing that God is always there for us. How...

April 14, 2018

Sunday Reflection

(Third Sunday of Easter)

The Risen Jesus appreared again to his disciples saying “Peace be with you”
 

First, He showed his nailed hands and feet. He is not a ghost that causes fear. Like Jesus, let us not hide our woundedness. Our multiple deaths and sufferings are not cause of fear but source of strenght. Once shared to others, it can in fact inspire them.

Second, He shared the bread. Table fellowship is another source of strenght. Living in community of friends will foster peace and joy. The Sunday Eucharist is a must for everyone because we see Him always there.

And lastly, He shared his command to become witnesses to others. If we are asked to share our woundedness, we are also sent to share the Good News. As the saying goes, “Shared sorrow is half sorrow and shared joy is a doubled joy”.Have a blessed Sunday. 

- Fr Louie Occiano 

April 8, 2018

Gospel Reflection God’s Divine Mercy Today, in the second Sunday of Easter, we celebrate a very special occasion. As officially announced by then Pope John Paul II, now, St. John Paul II during the canonization of St. Faustina Kowalska in the year 2000, the Second Sunday of Easter is especially devoted for the celebration of the Divine Mercy.

On this special day we remember and thank God for allowing us to experience his infinite mercy through the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ, His Only Begotten Son, our Lord and Savior. In her diary, St. Faustina Kowalska, the Apostle of Divine Mercy, writes these words of Jesus for us, “Proclaim that mercy is the greatest attribute of God. All the works of My hands are crowned with mercy.” Indeed, this is the attitude of God towards us: His Divine Mercy is what makes Him persistent in finding each of us, his lost sheep. Through His Divine Mercy he will do whatever it takes to find us. We just need to cast off our doubts and believe in Him so...

The liturgy this Sunday includes the Renewal of Baptismal Promises. Saint Paul understands our baptism is a participation in Christ’s Paschal Mystery—his passion, death, and resurrection (and our own future resurrection)—the center of our Faith. “Do you not know that all of us who have been baptized into Christ Jesus were baptized into his death? Therefore we have been buried with him by baptism into death, so that, just as Christ was raised from the dead by the glory of the Father, so we too might walk in newness of life” (Rom 6:3-5; see also 1 Cor 15:13-14).

During the Renewal of Baptismal Promises, we are asked to reject the person of Satan who desires through his works and his deceptions to unseat God’s place in our lives. And thus, we are asked to accept, profess, and renew our belief in God, in whose name we were baptized (cf Mt 28:19): in our Father who created us, in the Son who redeemed us, and in the Holy Spirit whose works sanctified us.

Once a year, together as a Church w...

March 31, 2018

This Black Saturday we enter into the mystery. Today we contemplate Jesus, there in the tomb, dead. In that tomb, he is dead, exactly the way each of us will be dead.

Death is our ultimate fear. Our lives are limited. Our existence is coming to an end. We will all die. In a matter of time, all that will be left of any of us is a decomposing body. To contemplate Jesus' body, there in that tomb, is to look our death in the face.

As we behold the body of Jesus in the tomb today, and as we contemplate the mystery of our death, we prepare our hearts to receive the Good News of life. 

We know that tomb will be empty and remain empty forever as a sign that our lives will not really end, but only be transformed. 

One day, we will all rest in the embrace of Jesus, who knows our death, and who prepares a place for us in everlasting life.

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